DIY Decor: Mossy Easter Egg Wreath

Spring Easter Egg Wreath

I don’t have a whole lot of Spring or Easter decor in my house, at least not a lot compared to how much Fall and Christmas stuff I have. So little by little, I’ve been getting and making a few things here and there. This season I wanted to do some kind of wreath using eggs for an Easter theme, and this wreath sort-of came together by accident. This is the story of an almost DIY disaster.

I was wandering the aisles of Hobby Lobby, looking for eggs that I can possibly paint and speckle myself. Then I ran across these little beauties in that were wrapped with a bow in a little egg carton.

More Speckled EggsCute right? I was so happy I found eggs already in the color scheme I was aiming for AND with little brown speckles on them. They’d be perfect for the wreath I had in mind. And I didn’t have to paint them myself! YAY! That celebration was short lived.

speckled eggsSee that cute little egg carton they are placed in? Well, little did I know, those suckers were glued in there, and I mean GLUED in there. So when trying to remove these eggs from the carton, I ended up having to tear as much of the cardboard on the bottom as I can, which was no easy feat. Then that still left these big globs of glue that were really stuck on there. When I tried pulling off the glue, it was taking the color/paint off with it. There was just no taking it off without ruining the whole egg.  Clearly, I bought the wrong eggs at Hobby Lobby, and this wreath is going to be a disaster.

So I had two dozen of these eggs I wanted to use for my wreath project, that had bits of cardboard and glue stuck on the one end which was rather ugly looking. So my next task was to figure out how I can conceal the ugly ends. Enter sheet moss.

grapevine wreath

I was planning all along to use this grapevine wreath I had in my craft stash. My original plan was to glue on the eggs through out, and intersperse little bits of moss in a few spaces. What ended up happening is that I had to use much more of the sheet moss than I originally set out to do. After gluing all the eggs on the grapevine wreath first, I then took pieces of the sheet moss to wrap around the “ugly” bottom of the eggs and filled all the spaces in between with hot glue. That pretty much is all it took to end up with my final product.

Mossy Easter Egg Wreath

To finish it off, I just added a super simple burlap bow. My wreath was complete and you can’t even see the ugly globs of glue and cardboard. What I though was going to be a major disaster, actually turned out to be a halfway decent looking wreath. Yay Easter!

Moss Easter Wreath

 

Neutral Burlap & Chevron Wreath

Neutra Burlap and Chevron wreathSo I’ve been doing a few little projects here and there when my kids give me some free moments (thank God for nap time). This one I had done a little before Christmas time, and a even added a little winter flair to it to make it more seasonal during that time. But it really is a nice neutral wreath that you can have up during any time of the year, at least in my house.

It was another super simple wreath to make, and I had many of the materials on hand already, including 3/4 of a yard of this gray chevron fabric I scored in the scrap bin at Hobby Lobby.

burlap and chevron wreathWhat you need to make this:

To make, start with the straw wreath form and take the burlap ribbon or long strips of burlap fabric  and wrap around the wreath until fully covered. Hot glue on the back to secure in place.

To create rolled rosettes: Cut burlap and whatever fabric you choose (I chose this gray chevron scrap fabric I found) into strips about 1-2 inches wide. Take the strip and fold in half length wise. Start tightly rolling one end of the fabric into a little roll, and start to hot glue it underneath to keep in place. Then start taking the strip and folding in towards the center, then turn slightly and repeat. Just keep folding in, turning slightly, and folding in again, hot glueing on the back every so often to keep the rolled flower folds in place. Once you get your flower to the size you want, take any excess and fold it onto the back of the flower and glue in place.

Burlap and Chevron Wreath RosettesI added the rolled rosettes onto wreath in whatever pattern looked pleasing and then hot glued onto the wrapped burlap wreath. Then I took some of the rest of the scrap chevron fabric I had, folded in the sides and glued them with liquid stitch to have a clean edged ribbon to tie at the top. It’s not the fanciest bow, but it adds little something.

In the holidays/winter time, I added a couple of these jeweled snowflake picks I found at Hobby Lobby to make the wreath go along with the rest of the snowflake themed decor I had at Christmas. They were quite easy to stick in and then take out when the season was over and I can keep it up the rest of the year in the spot of my morning room.

Burlap and Chevron Winter Wreath

Next up, I have a few more Spring and Easter themed projects I’ve had in the works that I’ll be posting soon.

Fall Is Not Quite Over Yet – Easy Burlap Ruffle Wreath

It is still November, and we are still technically in the fall season. Though I am totally cheating on Thanksgiving now since I started listening to Christmas music every day for the last 2 weeks (thanks to SiriusXM). I am seriously resisting the urge to put up my Christmas tree before Thanksgiving since I’ve seen so many of my friends and favorite craft bloggers put up their trees already. I’ll resist for a couple more days.

So since we have a couple days until we fully launch into the Christmas season, I have a few fall wreath projects that I whipped up in the last couple months and have been meaning to show on the blog. I was in the total wreath making mode this fall, and went a little crazy with the burlap.

First up, my Easy Burlap Ruffle Wreath

burlap_ruffle_wreath

This one couldn’t have been more quick and easy to make. When all is said and done, it probably took only 30-35 minutes to put together. This one is slightly larger than the average wreath since I used a 20″ form, but it goes great on my large empty family room wall. Here’s a Quick how-to:

Items needed:

Start your wreath by creating a small loop with your ribbon and push it up through from the back of the wreath form, starting in one section. You may want to use floral wire to secure this first loop in place, but that is completely optional. Through each of the three sections on the wire form weave and twist loops through. I did mine in a pattern of weaving the loops back and forth, with a little bit of twisting and fluffing until you make it all the way around the wreath form. Then you have a complete  burlap ruffle wreath. You can leave it plain as-is, or add in some floral pics, beads, etc.

burlap_fall_wreath

This wreath on it’s own has so many possibilities since burlap is so neutral, you can put anything on it. I wanted to be able to use this wreath for different seasons, so I didn’t want to permanently glue anything on it. On the above wreath I grouped together a few fall flower pics and just stuck them through the folds in the ribbon and the wreath form and they have held in place pretty well. I will probably change it up for the winter and spring.

Here is another burlap wreath I whipped up even quicker.

ChevronBurlapWreath

Ok, so I’ve bought in to the chevron decor obsession.  I want to use it on everything now, and have amassed a stash of chevron fabric and ribbon. Anyways, on this wreath I used this chevron printed ribbon found at Hobby Lobby. It was made the same way as the above, just a smaller wreath form which I only needed 2 rolls of the ribbon. I glued on a coordinating burlap flower, and done. This one was complete in 20 minutes.

chevron_burlap_wreath2

So that’s just a couple of the many things I managed to craft over the fall, mostly done before our little girl arrived and took up all of my time. Ok, done with that now. Time to usher in Christmas. Where’s my Christmas tree?